When your company or organization is trying to implement a new culture or formulating one, it should hold a unique point. Because KG is trying to implement the new learning culture where learning doesn’t have to be in a class but you can learn through other media such as reading, videos and podcasts. By unique it can have a range of things, the unique approach, the unique ritual to make it more sticky, the unique culture and many more unique approaches. This unique point will bring out the stickiness factor more for everyone in the company. The author of The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell, defines the Stickiness Factor as the quality that compels people to pay close, sustained attention to a product, concept, or idea. The stickiness will depend on the context.  Bola, one of KG’s business units, had a really interesting ritual and requirement to work there. The requirement is that you can’t just like sports, you have to love it and be crazy about it. You can’t just know the surface or basic knowledge of the sport that you are into, you have to know facts about it. For example, if you are into Formula 1, you have to know the fact of the champion in 1997, which drivers use which car and so on. The unique ritual is that every Friday at 3 PM, either you have work to do or meetings, it would be stopped and everyone has to play soccer. Larisin and Corporate HRD have a common practice in implementing the learning culture. Once a week an employee has to do a “Ted Talk” where they share the knowledge they know to everyone there. This knowledge can be your expertise or something that you know or do for fun. In order to have the learning culture mindset by doing this kind of knowledge sharing can strengthen the need of learning culture. Since you have to share your knowledge you have to at least learn something. The unique approach talked in Harvard Business Review is “shocking rules”, in other words, rituals and practices that are memorable, so “bizarre,” that people inside the organization “encounter almost daily” and that people who hear about them wonder why they are necessary. There are many examples of this “shocking rules” such as Amazon where Jeff Bezos insisted that the office furniture are built or bought by buying cheap materials, especially the desk where they bought cheap doors and nail the legs to it. This shocking rule reminds everyone that even though they are one of the biggest online marketplaces with billions in revenue, they should look at every opportunity to save money so they can deliver the best products at the lowest cost. In the end, not every lock can be opened with every key. This unique approach may work at your business or company, but at times it wouldn’t. It could because of the previous culture was too great of a difference with the one you want to implement now. Shocking rules are worth the try.